Jon Fox, Wayne Horse, Raymond Lemstra & Stefan Glerum: ESPECIALLY YOU

JON FOX:

Jon Fox (1981) lives and works in South France.
Shifting and sliding between layers of lucid, illusionary mindscapes and dream worlds, apparitions of characters emerge. Embodiments, or manifestations of my own meditative thoughts and feelings. They often appear entangled within cyclical games and conflict, losing their way, or engulfed amidst the swirling clouds of a larger restless energy. Separately they highlight the multiplicity of a fragmented consciousness, altogether they become essential pieces of a bigger story. Striving to discover who is in control of this inner world where ideas are conceived, decisions are weighed up, and choices are made. Ultimately seeking the source of creation and the universal energy binding it all together.

It´s the second time Jon Fox show his work at the gallery.

RAYMOND LEMSTRA:

In childhood, one encounters and experiences many things for the first time. Through curiosity and imagination, these moments are lifted to almost magical heights. As you get older, new impressions become more scarce and it's a rare experience to be surprised by anything. I try to bring back the sense of wonder we remember from being a child, bridging the young and mature, by creating a contained fantasy world populated by my characters.

With my work I like to refer to the illustrative nature of primitive drawings and sculptures. What I find interesting about these is the distortion as a result of selective emphasis; parts of interest are emphasized, unimportant parts reduced or left out. For characters this means they come out big headed, where focus is on the face and the body is trimmed to its essential properties. I deliberately apply this primitive logic as a method. But I don't apply it equally to all aspects of my work. Instead, I choose to use a very mature, highly laboursome technique for the execution of my work. This contrast, between the naive and sophisticated, gives the work a somewhat awkward taste. A clash of intent, simultaneously assuming simplicity and complexity, randomness and reason, flaws and perfection. The purpose of which is to inspire a sense of joy and discovery.

WAYNE HORSE:

Willehad Eilers (1981, Peine, Germany) also works under the pseudonym Wayne Horse. Beginning his career in the German graffiti scene, Eilers later went on to graduate from the Royal Academy of Arts in Amsterdam. He continues to live and work in the Dutch capital today. His eclectic body of work comprises video, drawing, performance and installation, and is distinctive for its lyrical quality, playful humour and expressiveness. A recurring narrative in his oeuvre revolves around the bizarre, occasionally ugly but always compelling aspects of humanity.

To refer to Willehad Eilers as an artist-ethnographer is not too much of a stretch. Describing his practice as an investigation of the heuristically learnt political and cultural mores that define contemporary society, Eilers gently nudges us towards a poetic realisation of our social selves through his highly performative range of paintings, installations, videos and drawings. Infused with a mischievous, effortless confidence, Eilers’ crude-style works offer us anthropological insight into his observations of the flawed human condition and its perpetual evolution. He unflinchingly presents us with images that convey the disposition of the modern individual towards grotesque, even masturbatory obsessions. Underlying his practice is an artistic methodology that recalls the theorist James Clifford’s concept of “ethnographic surrealism”: he assails the quotidian situations that we think are familiar, and renders them unrecognisable. By mounting successive challenges to the hegemonic boundaries of our imagination, Eilers provokes his viewers into directly interacting with his highly unique works.

It´s the second time Jon Fox show his work at the gallery.

STEFAN GLERUM:

Stefan Glerum (1983) lives and works in Amsterdam.

Stefan spent four years in Breda studying illustration at the Academy St. Joost. He also worked as an assistant to one of the country’s most celebrated comic artists, Joost Swarte.

Stefan Glerum’s style is like a melting pot of illustration heritage. While its subconscious familiarity has universal appeal, his work is also a study point for those with knowledge of graphic design history.
His work is inspired by early 20th Century movements such as Art Deco, Bauhaus, Italian Futurism and Russian Constructivism, which he combines with popular themes, executed in a style reminiscent of the clear line.